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Home / Questions / SEXUAL HARASSMENT Sexual harassment is one of the major concerns of now-a-days workplace. Sexual...

SEXUAL HARASSMENT Sexual harassment is one of the major concerns of now-a-days workplace. Sexual...

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Sexual harassment is one of the major concerns of now-a-days workplace. Sexual harassment is bullying or coercion of a sexual nature, or the unwelcome or inappropriate promise of rewards in exchange for sexual favors. In most modern legal contexts, sexual harassment is illegal. As defined by the US EEOC, "It is unlawful to harass a person (an applicant or employee) because of that person's sex." Harassment can include "sexual harassment" or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. The legal definition of sexual harassment differs by jurisdiction. Sexual harassment is subject to a directive in the European Union.

It is unlawful to harass a person (an applicant or employee) because of that person’s sex. Harassment can include “sexual harassment” or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature. Harassment does not have to be of a sexual nature, however, and can include offensive remarks about a person’s sex. For example, it is illegal to harass a woman by making offensive comments about women in general. Both victim and the harasser can be either a woman or a man, and the victim and harasser can be the same sex. Although the law doesn’t prohibit simple teasing, offhand comments, or isolated incidents that are not very serious, harassment is illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment or when it results in an adverse employment decision (such as the victim being fired or demoted). The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

In the 2006 case of Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway Co. v. White, the standard for retaliation against a sexual harassment complainant was revised to include any adverse employment decision or treatment that would be likely to dissuade a "reasonable worker" from making or supporting a charge of discrimination.

 

 

 

In the context of sexual harassment, answer the following question:

Definition of Sexual Harassment

Categories of Sexual Harassment

Examples of Sexual Harassment

Preventing Sexual Harassment in Workplace

Complaint Procedures

Impact of Sexual Harassment at Workplace

 

 

 

May 16 2020 View more View Less

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